Pepper Cookies (Pebernødder)

The most original northern Christmas cookie is the pepper cookie. Before the modern stowe, this was the only cookie you were able to make yourself for Christmas.

The original recipe originates from Germany in the fifteenhundreds  and was made with rye flour, honey and strong spices.

My favorite recipe is from the fantastic Danish bakery Lagkagehuset (The Layered Cake House). The smell, taste and consistensy is perfect and children can easily make them.

Pepper Cookies (about 300 pieces)

  • Butter (2 cups/250 gr.)
  • Sugar (2 cups./250 gr.)
  • Whipping Cream (3.5 fl. oz./1 dl.)
  • Plain flour (18 oz./500 g.)
  • Ground ginger (1 tsp.)
  • Cinnamon (1 tsp.)
  • White or black pepper (1 tsp.) Black pepper will give you a little more umf, which in my opinion is a good thing.
  • Cardamom (1 tsp.)
  • Baking powder (1 tsp.)
  • Baking soda (1 tsp.)

Pepper BisquitsI often use gloves when I bake. This makes it possibly to attend to children in need in an instant. Make sure to use Nitrile rubber gloves approved for food contact. You can get them at about $0.2 a pair and though not as stretchy as rubber, they have a perfect fit.

20151124_203046_resizedWhip butter and sugar together with an electric mixer. Whip the cream in at low settings. Mix spices, baking powder and baking soda into the flour and mix everything together. Roll the dough into sausages (thick as a finger) and cut in small pieces. Roll them into small balls and place them on a baking sheet. Bake for about 7-10 minutes at 400 ºF/200 ºC.

You can freeze the dough for later use. If you flatten the bag it will take up less room in your freezer and will defrost quicker.

Eat them all yourself or give them to friends and family in jars or Danish woven Christmas hearts. Or you can play mouse.

Mouse – a Christmas game

Place a row of cookies on the table. One kid leaves the room and the others name one of the cookies “Mouse” The child is called back in and is allowed to eat until he/she picks the Mouse. At this point everyone yells MOUSE and a new kid leaves the room.

What is your favorite Christmas cookie?

Pumpkin Pie & a Failed Pinecone Paint Project

I never had Pumpkin Pie before, but according to Pinterest everyone is eating Pumpkin Pie this time of year, and with so many people eating the same thing, it must be good. Unfortunately Pumkin Pie is not at tradition where I live, so I had to make some myself to get a taste.

Pumpkin PieI looked for an easy  recipe for beginners and found Easy Foolproof Pumpkin Pie. Sounded promising. This recipe suggest that you use canned pumpkin and that’s absolutely fine by me, except for the fact that I couldn’t find it anywhere. The only solution was to make the puree myself. I used this recipe for Pumpkin Puree and because I chose Hokkaido pumpkins I could skip the peeling part. You simply put the roasted pumpkins and the rest of the ingredients in the food processor and that’s that.  Very easy. I don’t know what happened to the surface of the pie though. It certainly doesn’t look like Lindsey’s, but it did taste great.

Pumpkin PieYes… this is the right amount of whipped cream

 

 

 

After pie eating we had a little DIY planned. I saw this post on how to paint pinecones and thought it would be a fun little project for M and I. The look we where going for was something like this:

but O’s first comment when he saw our work was that they looked kind of like old dog turds.

Painted Pinecones

 

Thank you very much darling…..

Apple Brownie and Apple Juice

ApplesWe are literally drowning in apples this year. We have already filled the freezer with applesauce, which will later be used for apple trifle and yesterday we juiced the remaining apples.  When you juice you get a lot of pulp and it really annoyed me to let that go to waste. This  time I tried putting it in a cake. I used this Rivercottage recipe for Beetroot Brownie and simply replaced the beetroot with apple pulp. The apple pulp is a little dry compared to freshly blended beetroot, so to compensate I added 1 dl. of water (3 fl oz) to the pulp during blending. Even when I know there is apple in this recipe, the taste is still only that of great brownie.

Applejuice

Tip: Freshly squeezed juice should be consumed pretty fast, but if you freeze it in cleaned milk cartons, it will last several months. For apple juice you might consider adding a little bit of lemon juice to reduce discoloration due to oxidation.

 

Twig Lantern and Lemon-Butter-Chicken

Yesterday we went on a picnic to get the most out of the early fall. We collected copious amounts of pine cones and acorns for future crafts.

The mushrooms are starting to peep forth, but since we are newbies in the field, we left them for others to collect. I really need to see if there is any mushrooming going on in our area.

When we got home I wanted to make a twig lantern like this one.  First I used an old jar, but that turned out to be a bad idea. The bottom was slightly curved which caused the candle to slide and heat up the glass to the bursting point. No one was hurt. I used a hot glue gun to attach the twigs and added some acorns. Make sure that the glue connects all the way around the glass otherwise it will not last.

Twig LanternCheck that the bottom of your glass is completely flat.

While I was crafting and M was spreading pinecones everywhere, O made Lemon-Butter-Chicken. The recipe is repinned over 500 times which, I tell you, is no coincidence. Chicken, butter and smoked paprika are just an awesome mix.

 

 

What kinds of fall crafts are you doing this year?

 

Easy Shower Buns

My new mother’s group came by today. Very nice people and it’s great to have someone to talk baby with. I baked some super easy and great tasting cold raised buns for them. The advantage of this recipe is that you don’t need to get your hands in the dough, which comes in handy when you’re trying to look after the kids at the same time.

The name implies that it is actually possible to make these buns on an ordinary work day. Just put the buns in the oven – take a 20 minute bath – enjoy your toasty buns.

Here is the recipe: Continue reading Easy Shower Buns

Pyramid Shelf and Hot Chocolate

From the mid-1700s pyramid shelves (Amagerhylder) were incredibly popular among Danish peasants used as a display shelf. They have been unpopular for a long period, but have now found their way back – primarily in the children’s bedrooms.

Scrapping PaperThis pyramid shelf I got at a garage sale. I painted it black and added some scrapping paper for color. You can use wallpaper, but scrapping pager is cheaper. I finished with two layers of clear coats.

After all that hard work, just kidding it’s very easy, I needed some hot chocolate. This is the recipe we use:

  • Hot Chocolate2 cups (½ liter) milk
  • 1 oz. (25 g.) dark chocolate (70%)
  • A pinch of salt
  • Sugar according to taste (we don’t use any)
  • Cinnamon (we do that mostly at Christmas time)
  • Whipping cream
  • Vanilla sugar

 

  • Heat the milk with chocolate and add a pinch of salt. Whip often so the milk doesn’t burn. Add sugar and cinnamon if you fancy.
  • Whip the cream and add vanilla sugar according to taste

Enjoy

Old-fashioned Apple Trifle

Autumn equals Apples and for the first time, our little apple tree has blessed us with a decent yield. One of my favorite things to make with apples is trifle and this recipe is just how my mom makes it.

Apple_resized

  • 2½ oz. (70 g.) sugar
  • 1 tbsp. vanilla sugar
  • 2 lb. (1 kg.) apples peeled and diced
  • Whipped cream
  • Macaroons
  • Dark chocolate

Cook the apples with 2/3 fl. oz. (2 dl.) water in a pot. When the apples are cooked easy, add sugar and vanilla. Stir and cook until the consistency is just right. Allow the apple sauce to cool.

The sauce can be eaten with vanilla ice cream for dessert or yogurt for breakfast, but I like it the best used in a trifle.

Place layers of apple sauce, macaroons and whipped cream on top of each other and finish with chopped chocolate.

What is your favorite apple recipie?