Painted Kitchen Utensils

Painted kitchen utensils are all over the web right now and since we needed some new salad servers, I decided to try it out.

Ombre utencilsI gathered some inspiration on Pinterest from Liz and Sarah and ended up with some dark blue acrylic paint.

Preparation is everything so make sure that your utensils are cleaned, as greasy fingerprints will make it difficult for the paint to stick.  Don’t touch the utensils without gloves once you have cleaned them. Sand the handle lightly and you are ready for the paint job.

Remember you should only paint the handle of the utensils due to food safety

I got my (very cheap) utensils from IKEA but you can them a lot of different stores. I painted them twice and gave them two layers of clear coat. In between paint coats I sanded them again as the wood grain rose slightly.

Neon Utencils

Use a good quality masking tape for the border

 

 

I tried wasing my new salad servers in the dishwasher og even though they didn’t suffer an immediate death, they didn’t like it that much. I recommend that you wash them by hand.

Painted Kitchen Utelcils

I wonder if it’s possible to use porcelain paint instead (dishwasher safe). Has anyone tried that?

Color Changing Activity Board for Toddlers

At the age of 2, M was pretty adventuros and kept us busy tidying up closets  and drawers. Part of our effort to keep his little hands busy, was to make him an activity board (busyboard). Here he could explore to his heart content, without any risk of cuts, burns, poisoning, electrocution or breaking expensive items. The board itself is nothing new.

Basically you cut a piece of fiberboard or plywood to desired size, paint it as you like, populate the board with whatever your child likes and mount the board to a suitable wall.

Our son had a special intrest in switches and colored lights and to accomodate that, I decided to mount 3 switches each controlling one channel of an RGB LED. The idea is that the individual colors can be turned on or off, one by one, enabling the child to mix the colors. The result can be seen in the video below.

The light feature is designed to be inexpensive and very easy to build. Its based on a single 5mm RGB common anode LED with voltage reducing resistors for each color.  However individual leds for each color could just as easily have been used. I used hot glue to diffuse the light.

The diagram below shows the curcuit alongside my ghetto implementation of it.

diagram and implementation

As seen I built it using whatever I had lying around that day, making this instance of the project very inexpensive and low impact. Except for paint, solder and hot glue every part is made with salvaged materials.

When someone sees the board for the first time, children and adults alike, they seem to go straight for the light switches and stay there –  fascinated.

 

Twig Lantern and Lemon-Butter-Chicken

Yesterday we went on a picnic to get the most out of the early fall. We collected copious amounts of pine cones and acorns for future crafts.

The mushrooms are starting to peep forth, but since we are newbies in the field, we left them for others to collect. I really need to see if there is any mushrooming going on in our area.

When we got home I wanted to make a twig lantern like this one.  First I used an old jar, but that turned out to be a bad idea. The bottom was slightly curved which caused the candle to slide and heat up the glass to the bursting point. No one was hurt. I used a hot glue gun to attach the twigs and added some acorns. Make sure that the glue connects all the way around the glass otherwise it will not last.

Twig LanternCheck that the bottom of your glass is completely flat.

While I was crafting and M was spreading pinecones everywhere, O made Lemon-Butter-Chicken. The recipe is repinned over 500 times which, I tell you, is no coincidence. Chicken, butter and smoked paprika are just an awesome mix.

 

 

What kinds of fall crafts are you doing this year?

 

Hama Beads

As a child I loved beads and now as a parent I might even love them more. We use them to teach M the colors and to practice fine motor skills – in particular precision grip. It’s also quite fun for adults who may express themselves creatively.

Hama beadsYou can get different kinds of beads but I’ve been told that Hama beads are the best, so I went out and bought 30.000 beads in 48 different colors and a pair of tweezers, which I discovered, is actually pretty need to have.
Apparently birds are popular at the moment so I made a redbreast and a bluetit for the baby’s room, O made a little baby penguin and M made a spinning top (just add a toothpick and spin away).

Spinning TopWhen the children are finished with their bead projects, the question is always what to do with the craft? One idea is to put them to good use and glue magnets onto the beads and use them on the refrigerator.

Now for the ironing – we tried ironing the beads like this guy who uses tape, but O thinks that HE is the master of ironing beads and made his own video tutorial.

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